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PaWARN

PaWARNPaWARN is a statewide Water/Wastewater Agency Response Network (WARN) of “utilities helping utilities” to prepare for the next natural or human-caused emergency, organize response according to established requirements, and share personnel and other resources statewide, by agreement. Click here to learn more.

For more information about PaWARN, please contact Mike Snyder at e-mail: mikesnyder@pawarn.org

Information about COVID-19

In order to help you prepare for a potential pandemic, which could result in worker shortages and limited supply shipments, attached are some helpful charts you can use at your utility to begin developing a Depleted  Workforce/Pandemic Plan. If you need emergency assistance due to a coronavirus pandemic, contact PaWARN Coordinator Mike Snyder at 717-880-1303 or mikesnyder@pawarn.org

Below are some links to websites with helpful pandemic planning information along with current information on the outbreak. (Place your cursor on the link you wish to open and press the control button on your keyboard)

Cozen O’Connor: Legal concerns surrounding a potential coronavirus outbreak in the workplace and how to best address employee concerns. The link is below.

https://www.cozen.com/events/2020/how-to-prepare-your-hr-department-for-the-coronavirus

Updates regarding the Coronavirus will be available on the PEMA Website, which will be linked to the PA Department of Health.

Go to the PEMA HOMEPAGE – then click on the Coronavirus Information link (see photo below).     https://www.pema.pa.gov/Pages/default.aspx

Or use this link to go directly to the PA Department of Health updates:  https://www.health.pa.gov/topics/disease/Pages/Coronavirus.aspx

PEMA has created a dashboard designed to keep the private sector (which includes water & wastewater) informed and up-to-date on various emergency situations including the coronavirus. To join the dashboard, send an email to the PA BEOC (Pennsylvania Business Emergency Operations Center) at pabeoc@pa.gov

Johns Hopkins coronavirus dashboard:

https://www.arcgis.com/apps/opsdashboard/index.html#/bda7594740fd40299423467b48e9ecf6

 

AWWA’s coronavirus information site:

 

https://www.awwa.org/Resources-Tools/Resource-Topics/Coronavirus

 

Water Environment Federation’s Guide to Coronavirus:

 

https://www.wef.org/news-hub/wef-news/the-water-professionals-guide-to-the-2019-novel-coronavirus/

 

CDC’s coronavirus fact sheet:

https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/faq.html

AWWA has created a resource webpage for information on Coronavirus. Please feel free to distribute the link to your members, colleagues and concerned citizens – www.awwa.org/Coronavirus

 

PA Department of Health Website: Coronavirus Information
https://www.health.pa.gov/topics/disease/Pages/Coronavirus.aspx

What is coronavirus?

Coronaviruses are a large family of viruses, some causing illness in people and others circulating among animals, including camels, cats and bats.

The 2019 novel coronavirus (COVID-19) is a new virus that causes respiratory illness in people and can spread from person-to-person. This virus was first identified during an investigation into an outbreak in Wuhan, China.

What are the symptoms of coronavirus?

Symptoms of the COVID-19 can include:

  • Fever
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath

The symptoms may appear in as few as two days or as long as 14 days after exposure. Reported illnesses have ranged from people with little to no symptoms to people being severely ill and dying.

How can the Coronavirus spread?

Human coronaviruses spread just like the flu or a cold:

  • Through the air by coughing or sneezing;
  • Close personal contact, such as touching or shaking hands;
  • Touching an object or surface with the virus on it;
  • Occasionally, fecal contamination.

How can I help protect myself?

Prevention :

  • Cover coughs or sneezes with your elbow. Do not use your hands!
  • Wash hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. Use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer if soap and water are not available.
  • Clean surfaces frequently, including countertops, light switches, cell phones, remotes, and other frequently touched items.
  • Contain: if you are sick, stay home until you are feeling better.

In addition, it is recommended that Pennsylvanians take time to prepare now. View the PA Emergency Preparedness Guide.

Should I wear a mask or respirator in public?

The CDC does not recommend wearing masks or respirators outside of workplaces settings (in the community). A respirator is a personal protective device that is worn on the face or head and covers at least the nose and mouth. Most often, spread of respiratory viruses from person-to-person happens among close contacts (within 6 feet). It is important that these devices are readily available to health care workers and others who need them.

Should I cancel my trip to China?

Yes. The CDC recommends travelers avoid all nonessential travel to China at this time. For more travel information, visit our Travelers Page.

Should I cancel my international travel because of novel coronavirus?

The COVID-19 outbreak has been concentrated in China, and CDC recommends avoiding all nonessential travel to China. For travel advice for other countries, please visit that country’s Destination PageOpens In A New Window or Travel Health Notices on the CDC’s website.

What about animals or animal products imported from China?

The CDC does not have evidence to suggest that animals or animal products imported from China pose a risk for spreading COVID-19 in the United States. This is a rapidly evolving situation and information will be updated as it becomes available.

Resources

 

​Information for:

PA Emergency Management Agency recently launched Keystone Mesonet, an internet-based one-stop shop for weather and environmental data. The website provides users with all PA and federally owned weather data in one location.

Visit keystone-mesonet.org and learn more: http://bit.ly/3csl9NP

__________________________


Mark E. Nicely, P.E. Announces His Retirement…Best wishes to Mark on his retirement from the Board and Staff at PA-AWWA!

After 46 years in the water and wastewater industries Mark E. Nicely, P.E. has announced his retirement as of March 27th, 2020.

Mark graduated from The Pennsylvania State University (PSU) in December of 1973 with a Bachelor of Science Degree in Civil Engineering.  In January of 1974 he began working as a staff Engineer at Bankson Engineers, Inc. (BEI), a Pittsburgh based water, sewer and municipal engineering firm, where he specialized in management and finance.  In January of 1983 he began his utility management career with Hampton Township Municipal Authority (HTMA) which was the predecessor to the Hampton Shaler Water Authority (HSWA).  He also operated the Richland Township Municipal Authority (RTMA) under a management contract during the early 1980’s.  Mark became the manager of the Fox Chapel Authority (FCA) in February 1994, a position he held until his retirement.

Mark has been a member of various professional organizations throughout his career.  He is a lifetime member of the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) as well as a 30 year member of Water Works Operators Association of Pennsylvania (WWOAP).  Mark is a lifetime member of the American Water Works Association (AWWA) where he progressed through the Southwest District leadership positions and those on the state level, becoming the PA Section Chair in 2006.  He was awarded the Sam Baxter award for personal service in the water supply field in 2011.

Mark has been associated with the Pennsylvania Municipal Authorities Association (PMAA) for over 30 years, having been awarded the Sahli Extended Service award.  He has served as Region 10 Assistant Director and Director before progressing through the Executive Committee chairs to become President in 2012.  During that timeframe he served on various committees, most notably the Conference Committee, the Professional Development Committee and the Organizational Development Committee.

Mark has provided PMAA with Board Member training in the western portion of the state, and in conjunction with the annual conference.  He has acted as a moderator for numerous conference training sessions as well.  He was a speaker at the initial PMAA/PWEA (Pennsylvania Water Environment Association) conference on asset management to provide a case study on a successful program.  Mark was honored with the William Marcus award in 2016 for his service to PMAA.  In addition, he was presented with the PA Commonwealth Governer’s Local Government Award in 2013.

Mark is currently the Chair of Pennsylvania Water Wastewater Agency Network (WARN) and has served as such since its creation in 2007.

In retirement Mark will continue his duties as Vice President of his Home Owners Association (HOA) and is considering serving as a Board Member on his local Sewage Authority.  He wants to spend more time with his wife, Dolly, and their Beagle, Hoover, as well as their five, soon to be six grandchildren.


Subject: PrepareAthon Action #1: Join Your State’s WARN

Having trouble viewing this email? Click here
Become a key part of a network of utilities helping each other respond to and recover from emergencies and the damage they cause.

WARN members provide and receive mutual aid and emergency assistance — personnel, equipment, materials, access to situation reports and associated services.

Whether you anticipate damage or have sustained it, your utility is never alone when it is part of your state’s WARN.

So join today:
https://www.epa.gov/waterutilityresponse/mutual-aid-and-assistance-drinking-water-and-wastewater-utilities#2.

 

EPA WATER SECURITY DIVISION:
WHAT’S GOING ON
Developing Information Management System Requirements for a Surveillance and Response System (SRS)
EPA’s Information Management Requirements Development Tool for SRSs guides the user through a simple process to develop and rate information management requirements. The tool also generates reports for system developers. Download the tool at:
http://www2.epa.gov/waterqualitysurveillance/
surveillance-and-response-system-resources
Don’t Get Soaked
The “Don’t Get Soaked” video educates drinking water and wastewater utility managers, board members, elected and appointed officials on the benefits of investing in preparedness, response and recovery activities. It features testimonials from drinking water and wastewater utilities that include information about real world events.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kPK9j2S5TwE
Water/Wastewater Boot Camp Training
EPA’s new computer training — Water/Wastewater All-Hazards Boot Camp — walks utilities through how to incorporate emergency management activities into their programs and build overall resilience to all hazards. Many states have pre-approved the training for CEUs. Download today:
http://1.usa.gov/1HImhvC
Utility Preparedness Widget
EPA’s Utility Preparedness widget features several water resilience tools to share with drinking water and wastewater utilities. Work with your webmaster to place the widget on your website and connect water utilities to free materials that can improve their preparedness. Get the widget at:
http://developer.epa.gov/utility-preparedness-widget/

 Message from Patti Kay:

Greetings!

I am returning to my security/resiliency coordinator role after having been the Drinking Water Branch Acting Chief for the past year.  I look forward to catching up with all of you.

Below is information about new EPA training for the water sector.  You will find that the links are to our very new webpages, so you might want to replace any of your older favorites.

NOTE that PADEP did not approve this training and they will not approve it after the fact; however, I encourage you to view this as it is free and valuable training.
Please see below an announcement for a new water/wastewater focused all-hazards computer training from U.S. EPA’s Water Security Division. The training was developed collaboratively with water utility managers and state agency/water association representatives, and has already been approved by many state programs for CEUs.

————————————————————————————————————————–

EPA’s Water/Wastewater All-Hazards Boot Camp Training

 

U.S. EPA has released their Water/Wastewater All-Hazards Boot Camp Training, a computer-based training for water and wastewater utilities that focuses on emergency planning, response, and recovery activities and how they’re incorporated into a comprehensive all-hazard management program. The interactive training includes testimonials from water utility professionals, as well as links to helpful tools and resources to give utilities a head start on building resilience to all hazards. Many states have already pre-approved the course for continuing education hours for both water and wastewater personnel. Download the training here: http://www2.epa.gov/waterresiliencetraining/waterwastewater-utility-all-hazards-bootcamp-training

Click on the picture to get the Utility Preparedness Widget

EPA util prep

Along with the Boot Camp Training, water utilities may also find EPA’s Don’t Get Soaked YouTube Video valuable, as it educates drinking water and wastewater utility managers, board members, elected and appointed officials on the benefits of investing in preparedness, response and recovery activities. The Boot Camp Training and other training resources from EPA (i.e., ICS/NIMS training webinars) can be accessed on EPA’s Water Resilience Training page.

Patti Kay Wisniewski

Drinking Water Security Coordinator

Drinking Water Branch (3WP21)

US EPA Region 3

1650 Arch Street

Phila, PA 19103

215-814-5668

215-514-7893 (cell)

wisniewski.patti-kay@epa.gov


 

PUC Offers Tips for Residents During Power Outages

February 04, 2014

HARRISBURG – With Old Man Winter promising ice and a wintry mix for much of the state, the Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission (PUC) today provided tips for those residents who may lose electrical power.

When the lights go out

  • Call your utility. Don’t expect that others in your neighborhood have already called. Your utility can provide you with the most up-to-date information on when to expect power to be restored.
  • Check on elderly neighbors and those with special needs who might need additional assistance.
  • Use a phone that does not require electricity to work. Remember a cordless phone won’t work without electricity. Cable and VoIP service will not work. However, customers should familiarize themselves with their in-home equipment and locate the battery backup that will allow for a 911 call, if needed.
  • Keep your cellular phones charged. A cellular phone or corded phone on a landline may work if you are using traditional phone service.
  • Turn off lights and electrical appliances except for the refrigerator and freezer. When power comes back on, it may come back with momentary “surges” or “spikes” that can damage equipment. After you turn the lights off, turn one lamp on so you will know when power is restored. Wait at least 15 minutes after power is restored before turning on other appliances.
  • Only use a flashlight or battery-operated lanterns for emergency lighting. Do not use candles.
  • Avoid opening the refrigerator and freezer. Food can stay cold for a couple of hours if the doors remain closed. For longer outages, plan to place refrigerator and freezer items in coolers with ice. If in doubt, throw it out. The state Department of Agriculture has more information on food safety.
  • If you are going to use a generator, do not run it inside a home or garage. If you use a generator, connect the equipment you want to power directly to the outlets on the generator. Do not connect a generator to a home’s electrical system. Generators also should not be run near any open windows or other areas where carbon monoxide may travel into the home such as air vents.

Driving during a power outage

  • Eliminate unnecessary travel, especially by car. Traffic signals will stop working during an outage, creating traffic congestion. If traffic lights are out, treat all intersections as four-way stops. It’s required by law for safety.
  • Stay away from downed power lines and sagging trees with broken limbs.

Downed power lines

  • Don’t touch or get near any fallen lines.
  • Stay away from objects or puddles in contact with downed power lines.
  • Notify the utility company.
  • Never try to remove trees or limbs from power lines.

Consumers should contact their electric utility if they experience an outage.

  • Met-Ed/Penelec/Penn Power/West Penn Power: 1-888-LIGHTSS (1-888-544-4877)
  • PPL: 1-800-342-5775
  • PECO: 1-800-841-4141
  • UGI: 1-800-276-2722
  • Duquesne: 888-393-7000
  • Citizens: 570-524-2231
  • Wellsboro: 570-724-3516
  • Pike County: 570-724-3516

The companies also will be sharing information on social media such as Twitter. You can follow them: @Met_Ed; @Penelec; @penn_power; @W_Penn_Power; @PPLElectric; @UGI_Utilities; @DuquesneLight; @PECOconnect; @ORUconnect and @Citelectric. Consumers should not use social media to report outages or share account information or addresses.

The Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission balances the needs of consumers and utilities; ensures safe and reliable utility service at reasonable rates; protects the public interest; educates consumers to make independent and informed utility choices; furthers economic development; and fosters new technologies and competitive markets in an environmentally sound manner.

For recent news releases and video of select Commission proceedings or more information about the PUC, visit our website at www.puc.pa.gov. Follow the PUC on Twitter – @PA_PUC for all things utility. “Like” PAPowerSwitch on Facebook for easy access to information on electric shopping.

Public Affairs Advisory

Who: AWWA utilities
What: Chemical leak in West Virginia source water
When: January 13, 2014

Water utilities should be aware of a chemical leak in the Charleston, West Virginia, area that has caused local authorities to issue a broad “do not use” order. According to multiple reports, the leak is from a 48,000-gallon storage tank along the Elk River, which holds the coal-washing chemical 4-methylcyclohexane methanol.

West Virginia American Water Co., which supplies water in the area, issued a statement today reporting that “Water quality specialists also continue to monitor both raw and finished water and crews will conduct flushing throughout the distribution system.”

Nine directly affected counties have been declared a state of emergency; 300,000 area residents have been affected. According to CNN, the National Guard and the Office of Emergency Services are working quickly to provide water and supplies to area residents. Hospitals, nursing homes and schools are currently their top priorities to supply.

The incident may prompt media or customer questions about what steps your utility is taking to be prepared for such an occurrence. The following resources are available from AWWA to assist with potential inquiries and to review recommendations for emergency preparedness:

Planning for an Emergency Water Supply (USEPA-NHSRC & AWWA)
Emergency Water Supply Planning for Hospitals and Healthcare Facilities (CDC & AWWA)
All-Hazard Consequence Management Planning for the Water Sector
Business Continuity Planning for Water Utilities (Water Research Foundation, AWWA, USEPA)
Decontamination and Recovery Planning (USEPA)
Planning for and Responding to Contamination Threats to Drinking Water Systems Modules (USEPA)
Emergency Disinfection of Drinking Water (USEPA, for consumers)

Questions? Please email Greg Kail, AWWA director of communications.

AWWA National WARN Site

AWWA national WARN information web site.

EPA Incident Action Checklist – Water and Wastewater

EPA checklists for preparing, responding, and recovering from natural disasters. 

Drinking Water Advisory Communication Toolbox

The Drinking Water Advisory Communiation Toolbox provides information on how to plan for, develop, implement, and evaluate drinking water advisories.

EPA On The Go Website

EPA’s mobile website designed for water and wastewater emergencies.

NOAA’s Weather Site

Search the weather by city/state, or look for hurricane/tropical weather watches.

PA River Flow Forecast

River flow forecast site for the mid-atlantic region.

WaterISAC Water Security Network

WaterISAC is a community of water sector professionals who share a common purpose: to protect public health and the environment. Our one-of-a-kind resource serves as a clearinghouse for government and private information that helps our subscribers identify risks, prepare for emergencies and secure the nation’s critical water infrastructure.

  • PA-AWWA Recognizes Our Gold Sponsors

    Partnership for Safe Water

    PaWARN

  • Public Notification Providers

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